Art

Northwest Arkansas may be known for its jaw-dropping scenery, but the cultural landscape is also stunning, thanks to a thriving art community.

Fayetteville has long been a mecca for artistic expression. The city’s artistic community fosters creativity, thus, making it a hive for some of the most skilled artists in the nation.

Even the most critical art aficionado will find something to admire in Fayetteville’s visual arts scene. Public art beautifies nearly every corner of the city – from the Shop Local mural to the tranquil World Peace Fountain – while galleries like The Fayetteville Underground display the works of local artists year-round. 

More evidence of Fayetteville’s talent can be seen in public venues and galleries.

For a complete listing of galleries, request the official visitors guide here.

Run, don’t walk, to Mount Sequoyah for their upcoming dance collective “New Movement at Mount Sequoyah,” to view an eye-opening performance by BODYSONNET! The performance will start at 7:30 pm on both Saturday, May 29 and Sunday, May 30. The outdoor performance at Vesper Point on Mount Sequoyah is a culmination of a three-week residency with community engagement.

Fayetteville is excited to announce a brand-new mural at George's Majestic Lounge. George’s commissioned local artist Brandon Bullette last fall to produce a piece that celebrates the heritage of live music in Fayetteville and George's with artists that have graced their stage over the years.

August, 2020

Seated in the Ozark Mountains and home to the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville is known as a prominent academic center. Fayetteville’s innovative personality and artistic expression can be found flowing from the University’s campus and into the streets - in the form of public art.

Local nonprofit Music Moves is celebrating Black Music Month with a lineup of native talent.  Each weekend in June, Music Moves will be presenting a series of free online concerts via its website and social media pages in honor of Black musicianship.  Artists from all over the state of Arkansas will be performing in recognition of the extraordinary contribution of African Americans to music of all genres.

Fayetteville has long been known as the cultural epicenter and entertainment headquarters of the region, and one huge reason is the live-music scene, especially along the famed Dickson Street that lies between the Historic Downtown Square and University of Arkansas campus.